Most Recent SCC Webinar

Character-based Education

Wednesday, November 8 at 1PM Eastern

Ed-Quevedo

Edward Quevedo
Foresight+Innovation Lab

This webinar will engage attendees on three essential elements of intersectionality in Sustainability Education: citizenship and sustainable development, character development in young learners, and the future of a sustainable society. We will discuss and ideate relative to an established character-based learning model for secondary school and undergraduate application, assessment of learning tools for this model, and context related to ecosystems vibrancy, citizenship and leadership, and finding one’s calling in the work world. Attendees will come away with practical techniques for applying these modalities in their own institutes of learning and applied research.

Ed Quevedo directs the Regenerative Design Program within The Foresight+Innovation Lab, a collaborative advisory and creative agency composed of educators, policy innovators, social entrepreneurs, sustainability practitioners, and non-profit leaders working together to build the New Regenerative Economy (NRE). The New Regenerative Economy (NRE) is a fundamental reframing of the conventional consumer economy, grounded on integrity, sufficiency, social justice, and ecological regeneration, rather than consumption, exploitation, and the destruction of ecosystems in the relentless pursuit of profit. As a senior creative and trusted advisor, he has worked internationally and domestically guiding and advising some of the world’s most iconic and highly regarded companies, philanthropies, institutions of higher learning, and civil society organizations. Prior to launching the Lab with his fellow Agents in early 2017, he served as a Research Affiliate at the Institute for the Future in Palo Alto, California, where he directed their program in Regenerative Future Economies, and contributed to the Institute’s Peace and Social Justice Lab. Ed has led practice groups in Strategy, Foresight and Innovation, Environmental Law, and Sustainable Development at some of the most respected law firms and creative agencies in North America and around the world, including Pillsbury Winthrop, LLP of San Francisco, WSP Environment & Energy of London, UK, and Reos Partners of Oxford, UK and Cambridge, Massachusetts. He has also enjoyed an extensive history of service in higher education. From 2013 to 2016, Ed was Faculty in Sustainable Enterprise at the Lorry I. Lokey Graduate School of Business & Public Policy at Mills College, and Director and Senior Research Fellow at the Mills College Center for Socially Responsible Business. Ed also served was on the Faculty at Presidio Graduate School, where he held the chair as Dean of the Faculty. From 2003 through 2010, he was faculty within the Green MBA® Program of the School of Business and Leadership at Dominican University of California. Ed holds the A.B. in Philosophy from UCLA, and the Juris Doctor from U.C. Berkeley’s Boalt Hall School of Law and the Boalt Hall Program in Jurisprudence and Social Policy. He makes his home in Northern California, where he continues to learn from his children and the local communities he is privileged to serve.

The video recording for this webinar is available at: https://youtu.be/fNyETyJ3jc8

SCC Webinar

Sustainability Guidebook for Community Colleges

Wednesday, November 1 at 1PM Eastern

kristahiser

Krista Hiser
University of Hawaii

This webinar will describe the particular challenges and opportunities of teaching sustainability at community colleges. SCC advisory board member Krista Hiser will present a sneak preview of the forthcoming Community College Handbook for Sustainability Education and Operations, followed by Q&A with Bob Franco, president-elect of the Community College Alliance for Sustainability Education (CCASE) and Michelle Wyman, Executive Director of the National Council for Science & the Environment (NCSE). Takeways will include online resources, support, and an understanding of the role of community colleges in sustainability.

Krista Hiser currently serves as the sustainability curriculum coordinator for the ten campuses of the University of Hawaii system. Previously, as the Faculty Outreach Coordinator at Kapi’olani Community College, Krista facilitated the connections between faculty, and Service-Learners and community partners. She organized events such as Service-Learning Faculty Field Trips, Sustainability Institutes, and Faculty Institutes and she was a main contributor during assessments. Her passion for sustainability, service, and education was described as “the perfect ingredient” for the Kapi’olani program. Krista was awarded a Regents Medal for Excellence in Teaching by University of Hawaii, recognizing faculty members who exhibit an extraordinary level of subject mastery and scholarship, teaching effectiveness and creativity and personal values that benefit students. “Teaching students to make wise choices, supporting this development with unconditional love, and building on a sound theory of learning, Hiser uses multiple strategies to promote and assess student learning.

The video recording is available here: https://youtu.be/80Ggqm267Xk

SCC Webinar

Sustainable Design

Monday, October 30 at 2PM Eastern

Jason-Kliwinski

Jason Kliwinski
NJIT & Rowan University

Many Universities and Colleges offer classes, minors, majors and even masters in sustainability today. Often these programs are housed under the Environmental Science or other established academic science majors. When thinking about sustainability, we know the built environment has the single largest impact. It consumes over 70% of all electricity, emits 40% of all greenhouse gases, is responsible for 45% of all waste going to landfills, and consumes 12-15% of all potable water. Students in a sustainability program need to understand this impact and ways they can help reduce it in their own lives and work. The challenge in teaching this is that many of the programs in sustainability are not at places where there is a design or construction program and often students as well as faculty have no or very little backround in actual sustainable building design, construction or operations. During this course, we will seek to provide an overview of what makes a building green, resources to assist in developing and teaching content, discuss the triple bottom line of green buildings, and answer any questions or challenges you may have to the best of our ability.

Learning Objectives:

          1. Understand the impact of the built environment
          1. Define what makes a build green
          1. Discuss the triple bottom line of green buildings
          1. Identify available resources and tools for teaching about a green built environment

Jason Kliwinski is founder and Principal of his own architectural firm, Designs for Life, serving commercial, retail, hospitality, higher education and K-12 clients with offices in Pennsylvania, Central New Jersey and Midtown Manhattan serving the Tri-State area. Today Jason focuses on three main areas: green architecture, consulting and educational training. He is adjunct faculty at NJIT and Rowan University. In 2012 Jason was named a LEED Fellow by the US Green Building Council, one less than 400 in the world, which is the highest professional accreditation through peer review of an applicant’s work. Jason co-founded the Green Building Center in 2010 to focus on providing owners, developers, property managers, and real estate professionals a convenient ‘one-stop’ location that brings green consulting, design, construction, products, alternate financing and education together under one roof using a unique integrative project delivery (IPD) approach. Jason is a passionate educator with a vision of creating a culture of sustainability. He has developed curriculum for K-12, higher education and professional development levels on a range of topics since 2006. His curriculum is based in large part on his hand-on work in the green building market that includes carbon neutrality and net zero energy master planning & design, integration of renewable energy technologies, energy efficiency, use of healthy and environmentally responsible products, water conservation, and improved occupant comfort and performance.

The video recording is available here: https://youtu.be/aSQvBUFmnqk

SCC Webinar

Sustainability Competencies

Wednesday, October 25 at 2PM Eastern

Peter Buckland
Penn State University

Elyzabeth Engle
Penn State University

Peter Buckland has written in The Field Guide to Teaching Sustainability that “[t]oday, ‘wicked problems’ like anthropogenic climate change challenge educational leaders to develop their ecological literacy and sustainability competencies.” In a series of posts, Peter has examined multiple literacies in general; ecological literacy and sustainability competencies in more detail; and a call for integrating ecological literacy as a moral literacy and sustainability competencies into educational leadership culture. In this webinar, Peter will introduce the basics of sustainability competencies to the SCC audience. He will draw upon his own research and thought leadership, as well as the workshops on sustainability competencies he has led with colleagues at the Penn State Sustainability Institute. He will also discuss a new white paper on sustainability competencies produced by his colleagues that incorporates ethical literacy as a competency.

Peter Buckland works on academic and outreach programming at Penn State’s Sustainability Institute and is affiliate faculty in Educational Theory and Policy. He curates The Field Guide to Teaching Sustainability, coordinates special programs and presentations for sustainability, and teaches courses in sustainability, education, and leadership. Peter has communicated widely on sustainability, environmental issues, education, and music in popular and peer-reviewed press, including The International Journal of Ethics Education, The Journal of Educational Leadership, Policy, and Practice, Reviews of the National Center for Science Education, International Journal of Illich Studies, the Yale Cultural Cognition Project, and the Rock Ethics Institute’s “Ask an Ethicist.” Currently, Peter is working on a number of sustainability-related projects. These include ongoing blogging and development of The Field Guide to Teaching Sustainability as well as work on climate change communication and education, sustainability education praxis, and ecofeminist care ethics for teaching sustainability problem-posing.

Elyzabeth’s (Elly) main areas of interest include the critical analysis of sustainable development outcomes and environmental justice implications of community food system initiatives. Using a mixed methods research design, Elly’s current research employs a Food-Energy-Water Nexus approach to explore the stakeholders, processes, and outcomes of rural community-based gardening programs taking place across the coal-impacted region of Central Appalachia. Elly’s applied research approach is informed by the scholarship and practice of community engagement, which in turn supports a critical pedagogical approach to teaching about sustainability and society-nature relationships. With co-authors from Penn State’s Sustainability Institute, Elly recently published a research-based framework for understanding key competencies for sustainability, forthcoming from The International Journal of Higher Education and Sustainability.

Video recording available at: https://youtu.be/J9zk7RdC9U4

SCC Webinar

Sustainability Science

Monday, October 23 at 2PM Eastern

23

Vanessa Levesque
University of New Hampshire
Thad Miller
Arizona State University

Vanessa Levesque and Thad Miller headline SCC’s first webinar focusing on sustainability science. Thad will lead off with a presentation introducing how he and other leaders in the field conceptualize sustainability science, as he details in his book Reconstructing Sustainability Science. Attendees will learn about the origins of sustainability science, how the space has evolved, and the extent to which it can distinguished from other perspectives on sustainability.

Vanessa will then present a case study of how some guiding concepts of sustainability science have informed a mid-level Sustainability Methods class at UNH. She will talk about which guiding concepts she chose to focus on, how she uses those concepts to structure the content of the course, her struggles in finding undergraduate-level resources focused on those topics, and how she is having her students create a Sustainability Methods Reader as part of an open pedagogy approach to develop the resources needed to teach these topics.

Vanessa Levesque is the Assistant Director and Lecturer for the Sustainability Dual Major at University of New Hampshire-Durham. Dr. Levesque received her PhD in Ecology and Environmental Studies from the University of Maine as a research fellow with the Sustainability Solutions Initiative. Her teaching and research integrates knowledge and methods from multiple disciplines, with a particular interest in sustainability science and collaborative governance. Dr. Levesque holds an MS in Natural Resources Planning from the University of Vermont and a BA in Ecology and Evolution from Dartmouth College.

Thad Miller is an assistant professor at the School for the Future of Innovation in Society and The Polytechnic School at Arizona State University. His research explores how sustainability is interpreted, contested, materialized and settled in science and technology policy and infrastructure design. He is on the Executive Management Team for the National Science Foundation-funded Urban Resilience to Extremes Sustainability Research Network, and co-PI of the NSF-funded STIR Cities project. His recent book, Reconstructing Sustainability Science: Knowledge and Action for a Sustainable Future, part of the Earthscan Routledge Science in Society Series, examines how scientists can navigate epistemic and normative tensions to link knowledge to social action.

Video recording available at: https://youtu.be/23rDb0jCqts

SCC Webinar

Case Study Teaching for Sustainability and Environmental Education

May 23, 2017 at 2:00 PM EST

Case-Study-Teaching-for-SustainabilityThese leaders in sustainability education are focusing on case studies and collaborating to describe what they see as the challenges faced in designing cases, building a collection of cases, and engaging faculty and others in the creation and use of these cases. Their discussions and written commentary about case study teaching are a proxy for broader discussions about the challenges of teaching about complex environmental challenges.

The case study method has long been used as a pedagogical method in fields such as medicine, law, and business, but its use in the fields of sustainability and environmental education is far less established. However, recent efforts by multiple organizations to advance case study teaching and to develop case study teaching resources for sustainability and environmental education suggest a growing recognition of the utility and promise of this approach for these fields. In this webinar, they will discuss efforts by four organizations to develop sustainability and environmental case study resources including: the National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center (SESYNC)’s Teaching about Socio-Environmental Synthesis with Case Studies short course, the University of Michigan’s Michigan Sustainability Cases initiative, the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies’ Case Study Integration Initiative, and the University of California Press’s new online journal, Case Studies in the Environment. They will discuss challenges and approaches in designing and implementing case studies for teaching, insights gained through each of our efforts, and resources for case study teaching.

Cynthia Wei is the Associate Director of Education at SESYNC. In this role, she works to advance the teaching and learning of socio-environmental synthesis by developing, running, and supporting several SESYNC programs and initiatives. Prior to coming to SESYNC, she worked on several national STEM education programs and initiatives related to biology education, climate change education, evolution education, and the role of community colleges in STEM education, work which built on her experiences as a K-12 science teacher and college-level biology instructor. This work was completed during her time as an American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Science and Technology Policy Fellow at the National Science Foundation (NSF)’s Division of Undergraduate Education and a Christine Mirzayan Science & Technology Policy Fellow at the National Academy of Sciences (NAS). At Michigan State University, she earned a dual-degree Ph.D. in zoology and ecology, evolutionary biology, and behavior. She holds a B.A. in biology (neurobiology and behavior) from Cornell University. She is also a section co-editor for the new journal Case Studies in the Environment.

Minna Brown directs the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies’ Case Study Integration Initiative. In this role, she identifies, develops, and assists with the incorporation of applied case studies into the F&ES curriculum. Working collaboratively with faculty, students, and alumni, Minna builds comprehensive, academically sound, interdisciplinary online case studies covering subjects such as the impacts of palm oil in Indonesia, approaches to urban climate change adaptation, and compromises over water rights in the Klamath River basin. She also provides resources for student case study development and curates a collection of external case studies for FES use. Minna holds a Master of Environmental Management degree from F&ES, where her studies focused on environmental communication and climate change. She holds a B.A. in Sociology and Anthropology from Middlebury College.

Meghan Wagner is the Project Coordinator for Michigan Sustainability Cases (MSC) at the University of Michigan. In her work with MSC, she facilitates case study production through collaborative partnerships with teams of students, faculty, and practitioners. Her transition into the field of sustainability was catalyzed by her experience teaching environmental science at the community college level, and longstanding interests in climate change and science communication. Meghan holds a Ph.D. in Earth and Environmental Sciences from the University of Michigan, where her research focused on trace metal accumulation in marine sediments. She also holds an M.S. in Chemistry from the University of Michigan and a B.S. in Chemistry from Indiana University. Prior to graduate school, she served as a Science Resource Volunteer with the Peace Corps in South Africa.

Video recording available at https://youtu.be/0tu4wthorlw

SCC Webinar

The Significance of Voluntary Sustainability Standards

May 16, 2017

Karin-KreiderKarin Kreider leads ISEAL, the organization that coordinates the activities of many of the most recognizable sustainability standards and eco-labels. Karin will introduce the audience to the complex voluntary standards landscape and explain the role of sustainability standards across various sectors and contexts. She will present specific case studies illustrating how the initiatives of ISEAL members utilize sustainability standards in the US and around the world. This webinar will assist sustainability educators in understanding the increasing importance of voluntary standards in the sustainability space, whether because of regulatory roll-backs, or in supply chain management, or as an emerging component of private governance.

Karin Kreider is the Executive Director of the ISEAL Alliance – the global backbone organization for the sustainability standards movement. She is one of the world’s leading experts on ecolabels, sustainability standards and certification. Before joining ISEAL in 2009, she was involved in the start-up of Rainforest Alliance, and worked there for more than 20 years, first as Associate Director of the organisation, and then as Director of the Sustainable Agriculture Programme. Karin holds a BFA and an MBA from New York University and is based in London.

Video recording available at https://youtu.be/qWNhP3fI5zs

SCC Webinar

EarthEd: Rethinking Education on a Changing Planet

April 10, 2017 at 2:00 PM EST

Untitled-7Join Erik and Jonathan as they discuss how to rethink education–and particularly the classroom experience–to prepare students for life on a changing planet. Erik will discuss the broader ideas and strategies that are part of the upcoming State of the World report: EarthEd: Rethinking Education on a Changing Planet. Jonathan will discuss his chapter in depth, exploring innovative ways to “bring the classroom back to life,” particularly at the university level.

Erik Assadourian is a Senior Fellow at the Worldwatch Institute. Over the past 15 years with Worldwatch, Erik has directed two editions of Vital Signs and five editions of State of the World, including the 2013 edition: Is Sustainability Still Possible? and the upcoming 2017 edition: EarthEd: Rethinking Education on a Changing Planet. Erik also directs Worldwatch’s Transforming Cultures project, and designed Catan: Oil Springs, an eco-educational scenario for the popular board game Settlers of Catan. Over the past few years, Erik has also been working to produce Yardfarmers, a reality TV show that follows six Millennial Americans as they exit the consumer economy to live with their parents and become sufficiency farmers.

Jonathan Dawson is a sustainability educator, currently working as Head of Economics at Schumacher College in Devon. Until recently a long-term resident at the Findhorn ecovillage and a former President of the Global Ecovillage Network, he has around 20 years experience as a researcher, author, consultant and project manager in the field of small enterprise development in Africa and South Asia. Jonathan is the principal author of the Gaia Education sustainable economy curriculum <www.gaiaeducation.org>, drawn from best practice within ecovillages worldwide, that has been endorsed by UNITAR and adopted by UNESCO as a valuable contribution to the UN Decade of Education for Sustainable Development.

The video recording is available at: https://youtu.be/C4OZBg7RX-Y

 

SCC Webinar

Mauo webinar series #2:
The Meeting of Wisdoms

March 31, 2017 at 2:00 PM EST

In this webinar, Krista Hiser & Matt Lynch share lessons from an ongoing dialogue in the University of Hawaii system about global sustainability and indigenous wisdom in the context of localized climate impacts. A concept paper from Hawaii’s statewide summit on Sustainability in Higher Education will be shared, with links to a panel of scholars representing indigenous and western frameworks. Krista will share a synthesis of sustainability learning outcomes, pedagogical practices, and suggestions for mutual strengthening of indigenous communities and approaches to sustainability in higher education.

Krista Hiser is Professor of Composition & Rhetoric at Kapi?olani Community College, where she team teaches the learning community course: “Decade Zero: Understanding the Science & Rhetoric of Climate Change.” Her research in Educational Administration focuses on Higher Education for Sustainable Development. She has published on community engagement, service-learning, organizational change, post-apocalyptic and cli-fi literature. She is a recipient of the Board of Regents Award for Excellence in Teaching and the University of Hawaii President’s Award for Leadership in Sustainability. Currently serving as the University of Hawaii’s Interim System Sustainability Curriculum Coordinator, Dr. Hiser’s current work is to facilitate interdisciplinary dialogue and professional development opportunities for faculty to update and transform their courses and help the University of Hawaii system to ho’omauo *

Matthew Kamakani Lynch is the System Sustainability Coordinator for the ten campuses of the University of Hawaii. He is also founder of of the Honolulu based nonprofit Asia-Pacific Center for Regenerative Design, and currently serves on the Board of Directors for Kahumana Organic Farm, Slow Food Oahu, and Hawaii Green Growth. He has worked in a broad range of community-based sustainable development projects from Mongolia to Australia and throughout the Pacific, from building rural community resilience through farmer trainings, to sustainable economic development, to catalyzing institutional change through policy work and collaborative leadership. Matt’s talent for energizing communities and individuals has re-humanized urban and institutional systems in the developing and developed worlds, and works towards restoring & regenerating the ecological systems upon which these social systems depend.

Mauo = the perpetuation of our well-being
ho’omauo = to perpetuate our well-being

The video recording is available here: https://youtu.be/MUA_TepsFBQ

SCC Webinar

“Connecting Transformative Learning & Behavior Change”

Tuesday, March 14 at 2PM Eastern

030817Deborah McNamara and Lacy Cagle
Northwest Earth Institute (NWEI)

Sustainability education at its best should address the “say-do gap,” which behavior change experts cite as being the difference between saying what we believe and actually doing it. This webinar will provide resources for moving beyond knowledge acquisition to application, shared learning and shared action – thus enabling more effective sustainability education and engagement grounded in a transformative, participatory learning process developed by the Northwest Earth Institute, a non-profit organization offering a series of discussion-based course books as well as a complementary online action EcoChallenge platform for educators, sustainability officers, students and higher education staff alike.

Webinar participants will identify new tools that address connections between transformative learning and behavior change and will learn how to implement any NWEI program on their campus or in the classroom.

Recording available at: https://youtu.be/Q5YbSKkvVsw

SCC Webinar

“Leading Change: Leveraging Change Management to Achieve Your Goals”
with Becki Hack
Monday, February 13, 2017
2PM Eastern time

BeckiHackIntegrating sustainability into curricula represents a significant change to the way educators think, work, and, often, organize.

So how can change agents—whether leading a grassroots initiative or driving an institutional mandate—increase the probability of achieving their ESD goals? By equipping themselves with a structured change management methodology routinely used and proven successful in organizational change.

“Change management” focuses on the “people side of change” and provides the discipline for preparing, equipping, and supporting individuals in adopting the change that drives desired outcomes.

This session will help participants look at their institutions’ ESD change initiatives using the lens of a leading change management framework and immediately begin applying those concepts to their respective organization’s unique vision, structure, culture, people, and circumstances.

By understanding change management as a leadership tool, change agents can design a plan to achieve their vision, accelerate change toward success, mitigate risks, and build institutional competency for the ongoing leadership critical to ESD.

Recording available at: https://youtu.be/d6AP3TA3OJU

SCC Webinar

“Better Messages for Sustainable Behavior”
with Wade Ferguson
Executive Director of Vermillion Institute
January 10, 2017 at 12:00 pm Eastern

wadeWhy do so many messages about sustainability seem to fall on deaf ears? And why do the graduates of our sustainability programs get resistance to initiatives with clear benefits (that they were often hired to enact)? For purposes of curriculum development, what else do our students need to know to succeed?

Educators can agree that a useful approach in ESD would include recognizing and avoiding pitfalls and promoting success. So this session will examine which messages are most likely to succeed in motivating people to act and sustaining their behavior.

Through an exploration of both moral development science and the real-world experience of experts, Vermillion discusses these questions to help faculty gear their courses and curricula towards useful learning outcomes for their students – the future leaders in business, government and NGO sectors. In light of new awareness, faculty will be better empowered to guide their students, their peers, and the community groups they mentor towards messages that improve public literacy about the issues and commitment to positive action.

Click here for the video recording of “Better Messages” with Vermillion Institute (January 10, 2016).

Creating Coherence

First webinar in the series “Mauo: the perpetuation of Well-Being”
with Krista Hiser, Professor of Composition and System Sustainability Curriculum Coordinator, University of Hawaii System
November 28, 2016 at 3:00 pm EST

November 28, 2016 at 3:00 pm EST

Mauo Webinar, “Beyond Green Workforce” (sharing new conceptualizations of educating for sustainability careers in Hawaii)

Mauo Webinar, “Island Sustainability” reports from the 5th annual Hawaii Sustainability in Higher Education Summit, focusing on the meeting of wisdoms, where indigenous and global perspectives on sustainability meet.

Mauo Webinar “Creating Coherence: Implementing a System-Level S Designation,” (December 12, 2016) Krista Hiser tells the epic tale of a ten year implementation of a system-wide designation for sustainability-focused courses. Any campus implementing or considering implementing similar STARS-based criteria at a campus or system level will relate to the ups, downs, and details of an S Designation. The UH system is currently benchmarking courses throughout the system with a goal to catalyze a rapid diffusion of sustainability content, pedagogy, research, and cultural and community engagement.
This webinar is the first in a three-part series to be led by Krista Hiser, based on sustainability curricula at the University of Hawaii’s ten-campus system. In 2015, President David Lassner signed Executive Policy 4.202. This series presents the story of how this policy helped catalyze a rapid diffusion of sustainability content, pedagogy, and cultural and community engagement.

The video recording of this webinar is available on YouTube at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lADBVtgvcYc&feature=youtu.be

Stop ‘Dooming & Glooming’: Engage Students in Solutions

Timely perspectives on climate and policy with Debra Rowe
December 5, 2016 at 2:00 pm EST

Debra Rowe has long been recognized as one of the leaders in the sustainability in higher education movement in the US. Her tireless work for our community of practice has been an inspiration for us all. Debra has agreed to share her perspectives on the current state of ESD at this critical juncture, especially with respect to climate policy after the Paris Agreement and the transition to the Trump administration. Pre-register now to participate in this compelling dialogue to move beyond the “doom and gloom.”

The video recording of this webinar is available on YouTube at: https://youtu.be/SAFiUnWjIo4

Teaching for Sustainability: Curriculum Integration, Instructional Design, and Emerging Faculty Cohorts

Pedagogy follow-up activity with Susan Santone and Jess Gerrior
November 30, 2016 at 3:00 pm EST

SCC will be following up our successful sustainability pedagogy webinar series by launching an interactive online forum for higher ed teaching professionals. As our next step in that direction, please attend this next webinar, in which we will lead a cohort-style discussion on faculty-identified issues that emerged in our AASHE 2016 conference session around the three main themes – content, pedagogy, and leadership. We’ll draw on your questions and experiences to generate a facilitated dialogue among colleagues, also including insights from conversations between Susan Santone (SCC Advisory Council member) and Jess Gerrior (SCC Director of Learning & Practice). Susan will provide her expert overview of curriculum integration and instructional design, and Jess will introduce SCC’s plans for 2017, including the development of our cohort model and skilled support for institutional sustainability education efforts. Participation by pairs or teams of colleagues is encouraged.

The video recording of this webinar is available on YouTube at: https://youtu.be/KjJH6QfQj_4

2030 Development Agenda Webinars

1The third and final webinar (held Tuesday, August 23, 2016) featured Debbra A.K. Johnson (DAKJ, LLC and SCC Advisory Council member) and Aris Papadopoulos (founder of the Resilience Action Fund), both leaders in ARISE: the Private Sector Alliance for Disaster Resilient Societies, explained the basics of the Sendai Framework on disaster risk reduction and its relevance to broader sustainability and resilience issues. Debbra and Aris emphasized the linkages between all three components of the 2030 Development Agenda, which, taken together, can serve as a comprehensive game plan for sustainable development.  The video recording for the third webinar is available here.


2The second webinar (held Tuesday, August 9, 2016) covered elements of the Paris Climate Agreement. Presenters included Mark Trexler (Climatographers); Wil Burns (the Forum for Climate Engineering Assessment and past president of AESS); and Don Brown (Widener Law School). Selected topics included: the role of business and industry; geoengineering; mitigation, adaptation, and loss & damage; and climate ethics.  The video transcript for the second SCC webinar on SDGs is available here.


3The first webinar in the current Online Dialogue (held Tuesday, July 23, 2016) covered the concept of “planetary boundaries” in the Anthropocene as a basis for understanding the new Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Presenters included Kevin Noone (Stockholm University), a co-author of the seminal Rockstrom planetary boundaries paper; Faye Leone (IISD), the content editor of Earth Negotiations Bulletin; and Ashwani Vasishth (Ramapo College and SCC Advisory Council member), who actively participated in the UN’s SDG stakeholder process. The video transcript for the first SCC webinar  on SDGs is available here.

SCC-AASHE Webinar Series

The SCC-AASHE webinar series on Pedagogy for ESD was a great success… and video transcripts are now available.

In collaboration with the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education (AASHE), SCC delivered a series of four expert-led webinars on pedagogy in education for sustainable development (ESD). See webinar descriptions below.

The recorded video transcripts of all 4 webinars are now available on the SCC YouTube channel.

Webinar 1: Beyond Science: Framing Sustainability to Welcome All Disciplines
Facilitator: 
Susan Santone
Description: Colleges and universities trying to integrate sustainability across the curriculum often encounter a common stumbling block: the perception that sustainability is relevant only to environmental science. This false belief can keep non-science faculty away from the table. This webinar will provide participants with a framing of sustainability that creates entry points for all disciplines. The session introduced a set of transdisciplinary concepts and show how ‘overlaying’ these concepts onto existing topics results in a fresh, sustainability-based lens for instruction. Examples from multiple disciplines demonstrated how all faculty can locate sustainability connections to field, setting the stage for integration across the curriculum. The video recording for Webinar 1 is available here. 

Webinar 2: Language and Inclusion: Educational leadership practices that enhance learners’ sense of ecological identity and efficacy
Facilitator: Jess Gerrior
Description: How sustainability conversations begin, who is invited to the table, and who is left out can determine how learners – including faculty, students, and other members of learning organizations – identify with and feel motivated to take on the broad issue of sustainability. Sustainability leaders know that it is about more than environmental problem-solving – that generating momentum for sustainable change involves difficult social, economic, and political conversations. What models and methods can educators use to create inviting spaces for learners to develop new and deeper connections to “sustainability”? This webinar was structured as a participatory dialogue/exchange. The video recording for Webinar 2 is available here.

Webinar 3: Sustainability at the Heart of Learning: Aligning sustainability with institutional, departmental, and classroom values for better student outcomes
Facilitator: Jess Gerrior, SCC Director of Learning & Practice
Description: The intellectual work of designing, delivering, and evaluating transdisciplinary sustainability curriculum, together with the practical work of enacting sustainability knowledge and skills in the physical environment are both essential to education for sustainability. But unless the “head” and “hands” are connected with the “heart” – the cultural, sociopolitical, moral values of learning communities – they can only reach so far. In this webinat we exchanged ideas and practices for tapping into what moves educators/leaders – teaching sustainability from the inside out. The video recording for Webinar 3 is available here.

Webinar 4: Course Redesign Strategies
Facilitator: Susan Santone, Creative Change Educational Solutions
Description: ‘Integrating sustainability’ into a course means adapting both content and pedagogy to create a learning experience that is more interdisciplinary, experiential, and focused on authentic problem-solving. How can instructors juggle all of these demands without designing a syllabus from scratch? This session presented a step-wise instructional process for meeting this challenge. This approach, used with colleges and universities across the country, results in high-impact courses that integrate core sustainability concepts; promote civic involvement; and align outcomes, assessment and instruction. Attendees will walk away with a design framework that brings learners through a process of engagement, deep inquiry, decision-making, and positive action. The webinar will illuminate that ‘integrating sustainability’ is fundamentally about effective teaching and learning. Therefore, this session is especially recommended for faculty development specialists—especially those who may falsely believe that sustainability is environmental education. The video recording for Webinar 4 is available here.

SCC First Webinar Series

What sustainability educators need to know about UN Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) initiatives?

In April 2016, SCC convened its first webinar series and online dialogue on what sustainability educators need to know about UN Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) initiatives.  The first 3 webinar video recordings are available for review.

Webinar #1: Wednesday, April 13, 1PM Eastern

Kim Smith, Coordinator of the Greater Portland Sustainability Education Network (GPSEN) and Instructor at Portland Community College, discussed recent developments in UN education for sustainability (EfS) initiatives at the international level, specifically Agenda 2030’s Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), the Ahmedabad Plan of Action, and the Global Action Programme (GAP) on ESD.     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u9bq7caY6q0&feature=youtu.be

Webinar #2: Tuesday, April 19, 1PM Eastern

Julia Heiss, ESD Team Leader at UNESCO, provided her perspectives on the outcomes of the UN Decade of ESD, and the agenda for UNESCO Global Action Programme on ESD endorsed by the UN General Assembly (2014), as well as exemplary climate change education and ESD programs for educators.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7EyBR0DPzQY

Webinar #3: Thursday, April 28, 1PM Eastern

Melissa Goodall, Associate Director of the Yale Office of Sustainability, discussed the role that higher education institutions (HEIs) can play in advancing more robust solutions to governing the global commons. In addition to summarizing her research which evaluated ESD activities across six UN entities, she described “smart partnerships” and the key benefits and challenges to UN/HEI collaborations.   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U6KkeP9xq4M